Cat, 25
Graduate student and environmental nonprofit minion currently residing in Washington, DC

 

americasgreatoutdoors:

We’re back! We missed talking with you about America’s great outdoors & sharing photos like this one from the Grand Canyon. Parks, refuges & other public lands are being reopened as quickly as possible. Please confirm the lands you want to visit are open.Photo: Peter Blanchard (www.sharetheexperience.org)

americasgreatoutdoors:

We’re back! We missed talking with you about America’s great outdoors & sharing photos like this one from the Grand Canyon. Parks, refuges & other public lands are being reopened as quickly as possible. Please confirm the lands you want to visit are open.

Photo: Peter Blanchard (www.sharetheexperience.org)

mothernaturenetwork:

Colonel Meow sets record for longest furThe famous feline, known for his love of scotch and disdain for dogs, now holds the Guinness World Record for cat with the longest fur.

Not science or environment-related, but I couldn’t pass up a fluffy kitty named Colonel Meow.

mothernaturenetwork:

Colonel Meow sets record for longest fur
The famous feline, known for his love of scotch and disdain for dogs, now holds the Guinness World Record for cat with the longest fur.

Not science or environment-related, but I couldn’t pass up a fluffy kitty named Colonel Meow.

dendroica:

7 Adorable Animals Imperiled by the Keystone Pipeline

ThinkProgress uncovered a letter from the Interior Department, dated from April, that outlines the many and varied ways in which the pipeline could wreak havoc to plants and animals (not to mention dinosaurs) along its proposed route.
The letter calls particular attention to a line in the State Department’s most recent environmental impact assessment that claims “the majority of the potential effects to wildlife resources are indirect, short term or negligible, limited in geographic extent, and associated with the construction phase of the proposed Project only.”
"This statement is inaccurate and should be revised," states the letter, which is signed by Interior’s Director of Environmental Policy and Compliance Willie Taylor. "Given that the project includes not only constructing a pipeline but also related infrastructure…impacts to wildlife are not just related to project construction. Impacts to wildlife from this infrastructure will occur throughout the life of the project."

(Read more at Mother Jones)

dendroica:

7 Adorable Animals Imperiled by the Keystone Pipeline

ThinkProgress uncovered a letter from the Interior Department, dated from April, that outlines the many and varied ways in which the pipeline could wreak havoc to plants and animals (not to mention dinosaurs) along its proposed route.

The letter calls particular attention to a line in the State Department’s most recent environmental impact assessment that claims “the majority of the potential effects to wildlife resources are indirect, short term or negligible, limited in geographic extent, and associated with the construction phase of the proposed Project only.”

"This statement is inaccurate and should be revised," states the letter, which is signed by Interior’s Director of Environmental Policy and Compliance Willie Taylor. "Given that the project includes not only constructing a pipeline but also related infrastructure…impacts to wildlife are not just related to project construction. Impacts to wildlife from this infrastructure will occur throughout the life of the project."

(Read more at Mother Jones)

Sharkception!

Everyone knows the story: The little fish gets eaten by a big fish, and the big fish gets eaten by an even bigger fish and so on.
But it isn’t often that the big fish is a shark — in this case, a dogfish — that then gets swallowed whole by a much larger sand tiger shark (Carcharias taurus), one of the nastiest-looking top predators in the ocean.

This bizarre “turducken of the sea” photo was captured by researchers at the University of Delaware’s Ocean Exploration, Remote Sensing, Biogeography (ORB) Lab. The scientists were in Delaware Bay this month to recapture sand tiger sharks that had been tagged with satellite-tracking tags, or to recover tags that had come off prematurely. 

Sharkception!

Everyone knows the story: The little fish gets eaten by a big fish, and the big fish gets eaten by an even bigger fish and so on.

But it isn’t often that the big fish is a shark — in this case, a dogfish — that then gets swallowed whole by a much larger sand tiger shark (Carcharias taurus), one of the nastiest-looking top predators in the ocean.

This bizarre “turducken of the sea” photo was captured by researchers at the University of Delaware’s Ocean Exploration, Remote Sensing, Biogeography (ORB) Lab. The scientists were in Delaware Bay this month to recapture sand tiger sharks that had been tagged with satellite-tracking tags, or to recover tags that had come off prematurely. 

paleopedia:

Roseate Spoonbill, Platalea ajaja (1758)
Phylum : ChordataClass : AvesOrder : PelecaniformesFamily : ThreskiornithidaeGenus : PlataleaSpecies : P. ajaja
Least concern
80 cm long and 2 kg
Andes, Mexico, Central America and Caribbean
Like the American Flamingo, their pink color is diet-derived, consisting of the carotenoid pigment canthaxanthin. Another carotenoid, astaxanthin, can also be found deposited in flight and body feathers. The colors can range from pale pink to bright magenta, depending on age and location. Unlike herons, spoonbills fly with their necks outstretched. They alternate groups of stiff, shallow wingbeats with glides.
This species feeds in shallow fresh or coastal waters by swinging its bill from side to side as it steadily walks through the water, often in groups. The spoon-shaped bill allows it to sift easily through mud. It feeds on crustaceans, aquatic insects, frogs, newts and very small fish ignored by larger waders. In the United States a popular place to observe Roseate Spoonbills is “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge in Florida. Roseate Spoonbills must compete for food with Snowy Egrets, Great Egrets, Tricolored Herons, and American White Pelicans.

paleopedia:

Roseate Spoonbill, Platalea ajaja (1758)

Phylum : Chordata
Class : Aves
Order : Pelecaniformes
Family : Threskiornithidae
Genus : Platalea
Species : P. ajaja

  • Least concern
  • 80 cm long and 2 kg
  • Andes, Mexico, Central America and Caribbean

Like the American Flamingo, their pink color is diet-derived, consisting of the carotenoid pigment canthaxanthin. Another carotenoid, astaxanthin, can also be found deposited in flight and body feathers. The colors can range from pale pink to bright magenta, depending on age and location. Unlike herons, spoonbills fly with their necks outstretched. They alternate groups of stiff, shallow wingbeats with glides.

This species feeds in shallow fresh or coastal waters by swinging its bill from side to side as it steadily walks through the water, often in groups. The spoon-shaped bill allows it to sift easily through mud. It feeds on crustaceans, aquatic insects, frogs, newts and very small fish ignored by larger waders. In the United States a popular place to observe Roseate Spoonbills is “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge in Florida. Roseate Spoonbills must compete for food with Snowy Egrets, Great Egrets, Tricolored Herons, and American White Pelicans.

(Source: palaeopedia)

mothernaturenetwork:

Getting too much done today? We’ve got a distraction for you: baby penguin webcam.
You’re welcome.

mothernaturenetwork:

Getting too much done today? We’ve got a distraction for you: baby penguin webcam.

You’re welcome.

mypubliclands:

BLM Prepares for National Public Lands Day 2013

Bluebirds, chickadees, swallows and other cavity-nesting birds will have new homes this year at Chilly Slough Wetland in Thousand Springs Valley in Eastern Idaho.  Local high school students helped the BLM build birdhouses that will be installed by volunteers for the National Public Lands Day event on August 10.

By: Krista Berumen

After 136 Days of Obstruction, Senate overcomes GOP objections, approves Gina McCarthy to head EPA


A new online tool released by the Department of the Interior this week allows users to select any major stream and trace it up to its sources or down to its watershed. The above map, exported from the tool, highlights all the major tributaries that feed into the Mississippi River, illustrating the river’s huge catchment area of approximately 1.15 million square miles, or 37 percent of the land area of the continental U.S. Use the tool to see where the streams around you are getting their water (and pollution).

A new online tool released by the Department of the Interior this week allows users to select any major stream and trace it up to its sources or down to its watershed. The above map, exported from the tool, highlights all the major tributaries that feed into the Mississippi River, illustrating the river’s huge catchment area of approximately 1.15 million square miles, or 37 percent of the land area of the continental U.S. Use the tool to see where the streams around you are getting their water (and pollution).